File a Complaint

To obtain a complaint form, please visit our Forms and Applications web page.

About Complaints

The Board of Chiropractic Examiners protects consumers through licensing and enforcement functions. The Board has the authority to require licensees to abide by provisions of the Chiropractic Initiative Act, Business and Professions Code, and those sections of the California Code of Regulations relating to the practice of chiropractic. Most Board actions alleging violations of these laws result from written complaints from a variety of sources.

All written complaints received by the Board are reviewed by the Enforcement Unit to determine whether the Board has jurisdiction, and if so, to prioritize the complaints.

Complaints alleging sexual misconduct, gross negligence/incompetence and insurance fraud are given priority attention and may be referred immediately to investigation. The Board also has jurisdiction over other categories of complaints, including but are not limited to, conviction of a criminal offense, deceptive or misleading advertising, and unlicensed practice.

The Board does not have jurisdiction in fee or billing disputes, general business practices, and personality conflicts.  However, other civil channels are available to handle these issues.

How Do I File a Complaint?

All complaints must be in writing. Please provide a statement, which describes the nature of your complaint and include specific details and documentary evidence related to your complaint.  This may include patient records, photographs, contracts, invoices, and correspondence. It is not necessary to refer to specific sections of the law which you feel have been violated. While anonymous complaints will be reviewed, they may be impossible to pursue without support from the complainant.  The information contained in your complaint will determine what action the Board will take.

How the Board Handles Your Complaint

Following receipt of a complaint, the Board mails a notice of receipt to the complainant. Each complaint is reviewed to determine the course of action for the alleged violation or whether the Board has jurisdiction. In most instances, the Board cannot effectively investigate cases where the complainant wants to remain anonymous. California law requires the Board to have clear and convincing evidence of a violation in order to sustain disciplinary action. Consequently, the Board's investigative process can be lengthy.

Substantiated Complaints

If a complaint is substantiated after review or investigation, there are different actions that can be taken against the license. Formal disciplinary action may range from a public reprimand, probation or even license revocation. As an alternative to formal discipline, the Board can issue a citation. Citations are considered sanctions and are issued in cases involving minor violations of a law or regulation governing the practice of chiropractic. The Board has authority to issue citations to chiropractors for specified violations of law. Citations are not formal discipline, although they constitute a public record of the action taken.